List of 55 provinces in Thailand that tourists don’t visit much

The Thai government recently agreed to give tax breaks to Thai and expat tourists who travel to some of the lesser visited provinces around Thailand during 2018. You can get up to 15,000 Baht in tax deductions when spending on things like package tours, hotels, transportation, food and even local souvenirs. Just collect your receipts and give them to your accountant before the end of the tax year.

For me, what is most interesting about this news is the list they produced of so-called second tier provinces that don’t receive that many tourists. I am all for travelling the road less travelled and so I am keen on making it a new year’s resolution to visit some of these provinces. What about you? Have you been to many of these provinces listed below?

Here is the full list of 55 provinces that according to the Thai government don’t get enough tourists:

Northern Thailand: Chiang Rai, Kamphaeng Phet, Lampang, Lamphun, Mae Hong Son, Nan, Phayao, Phichit, Phitsanulok, Phrae, Sukhothai , Tak, and Uttaradit;

Northeastern Thailand: Amnat Charoen, Bung Kan, Buri Ram, Chaiyaphum, Kalasin, Loei, Maha Sarakham, Mukdahan, Nakhon Phanom, Nong Bua Lam Phu, Nong Khai, Phetchabun, Prachinburi, Roi Et, Sa Kaeo, Sakon Nakhon, Si Sa Ket, Surin, Ubon Ratchathani, Udon Thani, and Yasothon;

Central Thailand: Ang Thong, Chai Nat, Lop Buri, Nakhon Nayok, Nakhon Sawan, Samut Songkhram, Sing Buri, Suphan Buri, and Uthai Thani

Eastern Thailand: Chanthaburi and Trat

Western Thailand: Ratchaburi

South Thailand: Chumphon, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Narathiwat, Pattani, Phatthalung, Ranong, Satun, Trang and Yala.

16 thoughts on “List of 55 provinces in Thailand that tourists don’t visit much

  • December 31, 2017 at 8:50 am
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    How is the Thai government going to give tax breaks to expat tourists visiting these provinces? Will tourists be allowed to visit a national park for free or maybe for the same price as Thais?

    Why is this detail not explained in the post about the topic?

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    • December 31, 2017 at 8:57 am
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      The point of this blog post is to list the 55 provinces that are not visited much in order to inspire you to go elsewhere. If it was about tax breaks, then that would have been the title! Anyway, to answer your question, this is only open to people who work in Thailand and pay taxes. Hence why I said expats. This is not for normal foreign tourists. Just collect your receipts, including admission to national parks. Then give them all to your accountant. She can claim back up to 15,000 Baht on personal income tax when you submit at the end of the tax year. The amount you can claim and get back varies depending on your salary. Your accountant or the human resources department at your place of work should be able to help you. What kind of company do you work for?

      Reply
      • December 31, 2017 at 9:54 am
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        Thanks for the answer. No need to get angry just because I ask an obvious question. I still wonder why you did not explain this highly relevant detail in the original post.

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  • December 31, 2017 at 11:34 am
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    I’d have a hard time recommending Pattani or Narathiwat for average tourists, but otherwise it’s a great list. I’ve been to many of the provinces on the list and always found wonderful places to visit and people to visit with.

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  • December 31, 2017 at 11:35 am
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    I’ve been to all of them, everyone… these would be my TOP 10 from the list of 55: Mae Hong Son, Nan, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Narathiwat, Pattani, Phayao, Phrae, Sukhothai, Trang and Yala (alphabetical order).

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  • December 31, 2017 at 11:37 am
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    Not enough tourists visiting Sukothai? Plenty of tourists in Nong Khai last time I was there too. Lots of Thais go to places like Nan and Loei, if they want us to go there perhaps they should think about their racist pricing system at national parks.
    And do they REALLY want tourists visiting the far south ? Visit Yala or Patani, the Hub of Adventure Tourism. (Yes TAT, you can use that as a new slogan)

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  • December 31, 2017 at 3:37 pm
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    Not many people will be able to benefit from this measure. It only applies to people who pay income tax in Thailand.

    Many expats who live in Thailand are retired so they do not pay income tax in Thailand.

    Many Thais do not pay income tax. In fact less than 50 per cent of Thai citizens pay income tax.

    In other words few people will be able to benefit from this measure.

    Offering a tax break is an indirect, slow and complicated method. If the Thai government really wanted to support these provinces and to let visitors benefit, it should use a direct, quick and simple method.

    For instance letting all visitors enter the national parks in these provinces for free, no matter their nationality.

    This case is quite typical. It may sound good at first, but when you take a closer look and think about, it you will realize that it is in fact a limited measure – a public relations stunt whose real effect will be very limited.

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  • December 31, 2017 at 5:27 pm
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    My wife,two children and I just returned from Udon Thani,Loei, and Nong Khai and had a very enjoyable and interesting holiday. My 14 year old daughter suggested Issan as a destination for travel during winter school recess since we have been to most other locations excepting the northeast. We couldn’t have picked a better location. Not over run by tourists. Virtually no foreign tourists. Very interesting sites. We plan to explore other locations in the northeast including during the times when there are local festivals. I’m an expat without Thai employment so the tax advantage doesn’t apply to me but for those that can get a tax reprieve while enjoying a holiday at a less frequented province I think it’s a novel idea.

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  • January 2, 2018 at 6:13 am
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    I’m near Lopburi for the last 3 weeks. I’ve not seen a single tourist/foreigner since I left Bangkok December 10th. Heaven!

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  • January 2, 2018 at 7:20 am
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    It’s kind of rare that I run into tourists in Prachinburi. We live near Ban Sang which is, aside from a 7, largely untouched. Prachinburi itself, while modernizing, still clings to it’s old shops hidden around the railroad station. Khao Yai park is amazing and I never get tired of going there. Yes, we are a little bit away from the beaches…. but I love it here on the river.

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  • January 7, 2018 at 8:14 am
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    What if you don’t have an accountant? Are all accountants women in Thailand????

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    • January 7, 2018 at 8:33 am
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      Where do you work? Surely your human resource department can assist you. And yes, all the best accountants are female 🙂

      Reply
  • January 10, 2018 at 9:35 am
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    Would you be introducing the different provinces listed?

    Reply

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